Search Results: "Cancer"

Animals in Research

Immunodeficient mouse with caretaker

Immunodeficient mice, like this one, need specialized care to ensure their health is not compromised. They are important for several research areas including immunology, infectious disease, cancer, and organ transplantation.  These particular mice are bred so that they lack a thymus gland, which reduces the number of T cells in…

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Species Entry

Fruit Fly

Fruit flies have helped to develop drugs designed to treat a range of diseases from skin infections and genetic disorders to pneumonia, and meningitis. Some of the recent research with fruit flies has focused on understanding Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, spastic paraplegia, cancer, obesity and insomnia.

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Dog

Dogs, although one of the least common animals needed for research, are among the most important.  Many cancers in dogs are identical, or almost identical, to human cancers. The cancer in dogs often develops faster, making them an ideal model to see if a certain therapy is effective. Many breeds…

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Rabbit

Rabbits are the reason our dogs and cats can live with us in our houses.  Louis Pasteur worked with rabbits to develop the first rabies vaccine which made it safe to bring pets into our homes.  Rabbits have a similar anatomy and physiology to humans, especially their cardiovascular system, and…

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Hamster

Hamsters are important in many research areas, including cancer, reproduction, virology, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Hamsters and humans metabolize fats and sugars in similar ways, leading to susceptibility to atherosclerosis and diabetes. When fed high fat diets, hamsters’ LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) will elevate, as in humans, and lead…

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Cat

Cats contribute to research in neuroscience, ophthalmology, retrovirus research, inherited diseases, and immunodeficiency diseases. Cats are a valuable model for the study of Alzheimer’s disease because they uniquely replicate various integral parts of the pathology of the disease, in a way that’s similar to humans. Advances in veterinary as well…

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Featured Studies

The tiny fish that has helped unlock the mysteries of human disease

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — In 1993, Leonard Zon had 110 fish tanks and an idea. Zon, a professor of stem cell and regenerative biology at Harvard University, thought to study human diseases in zebrafish. The freshwater fish, native to the streams and rice paddies of India and Myanmar, struck him as…

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Come See Our World!

Come See Our World (CSOW) is your window into the world of life changing research involving animals. We invite you to see the animals that are integral to medical progress.  Advancements in human and animal health would not be possible without these important animals, as well as their caregivers, researchers,…

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For the Media

Come See Our World (CSOW) is a project of Americans for Medical Progress (AMP). CSOW and AMP connect reporters with information, research contacts, pictures and videos to provide a current and accurate profile of the importance of animals in biomedical research and testing. Reporters may reach us at media@amprogress.org or by calling…

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Animals in Research

Marmosets with Tech and Treats

These are common marmosets in the lobby of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Dried fruit, grapes, peanuts and other "pocket treats" are provided by their caretakers. This helps provide enrichment and also facilitates the ability to do health checks and other routine care procedures.

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