Search Results: "Vaccine development"

Species Entry

Sheep

Sheep have a similar physiology to humans, can get many of the same diseases, have a short gestation period, and their young are born at a similar weight to human babies. These characteristics are valuable in research studies related to respiratory diseases and fetal development. Sheep have contributed to many medical…

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Species Entry

Mouse

Mice are the foundation for numerous advances in medicine, including therapies for cancer, heart disease, hypertension, metabolic and hormonal disorders, diabetes, obesity, osteoporosis, glaucoma, skin pigmentation diseases, blindness, deafness, neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, birth defects, and psychiatric disorders including anxiety, depression and schizophrenia.

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Animals in Research

Marmosets with Tech and Treats

These are common marmosets in the lobby of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Dried fruit, grapes, peanuts and other "pocket treats" are provided by their caretakers. This helps provide enrichment and also facilitates the ability to do health checks and other routine care procedures.

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Animals in Research

Baby rhesus getting mini marshmallow treat

Environmental enrichment is an important part of caring for research animals. Research animals are provided with several types of enrichment to stimulate species-typical behaviors. These juvenile rhesus macaques are enjoying mini marshmallow treats. Interactions with their caregiver give them social and intellectual stimulation, while strengthening their bonds with each other.…

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Animals in Research

Mom and baby rhesus on hammock

A rhesus macaque mom climbs into a hammock with her infant at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Females reach puberty at around age three, while males are sexually mature by age four. Gestation is five and a half months, with one infant born at a time and often a year or…

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Species Entry

Rhesus macaque

Rhesus macaque monkeys are an important animal model due to their anatomical and physiological similarities to humans. Many benefits to human health would not have been possible without these special animals, including the development of life-saving vaccines such as polio, smallpox, and rabies. Effective treatments for HIV/AIDS have been created because of research…

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Species Entry

Chinchilla

Chinchillas share anatomical and physiological similarities of the inner and middle ears of humans which make the chinchilla an ideal animal model for understanding and treating auditory issues.

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Animals in Research

Rhesus getting treat from his caregiver

Rhesus monkeys getting treats from their caregiver at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Healthy treats can include peanuts, grapes, apple slices, etc. Positive reinforcement is used to train the monkeys to move to transport boxes. These boxes safely carry monkeys to procedure rooms for blood draws, ultrasounds, TB tests, and…

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Animals in Research

Love, Care, Progress

Love, Care, Progress: Research Involving Dogs is the inaugural video in the Love, Care, Progress series, focused on the important role of canines in health research which benefits humans and dogs alike. Research professionals, including a trainer, scientist, animal behaviorist, surgical manager, and veterinarian talk about caring for the animals…

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Featured Studies

Cells recall the way they were

Adult tissues retain — and can recover — a memory of their early development, which might be a game-changer for cancer and regenerative medicine

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