Search Results: "Genetic diseases"

Animals in Research

Noel the mouse

Mice are one of the most common animals needed for research.  Most mice do not usually get individual names...but sometimes a technician will develop a special bond with one of their mice, like the technician who named Noel.  Noel is a Swiss Webster mouse. Swiss Webster mice are often needed…

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Animals in Research

Zebrafish and Anti-Cancer Drugs

Cancer is a complicated, devastating disease that has affected many lives.  New cancer treatments are continually developed because cancer cells change and resist treatment. Other treatments may work for one kind of cancer, but not another. New drugs must be evaluated in animals before they can be given to humans…

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Animals in Research

Zebrafish and Spinal Cord Regeneration

Researchers recently discovered a clue to how zebrafish self-heal spinal cord injuries. Damaged cells secrete a special growth factor that is required for regeneration in these animals. Humans have a similar growth factor, but human spinal cords do not heal when severed.  Further investigation with zebrafish may lead to the…

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Animals in Research

Marmosets with Tech and Treats

These are common marmosets in the lobby of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Dried fruit, grapes, peanuts and other "pocket treats" are provided by their caretakers. This helps provide enrichment and also facilitates the ability to do health checks and other routine care procedures.

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Animals in Research

Love Letters Series – Brick in the Wall

Brick in the Wall (2017) is part of the Love Letter Series which connects the inspiring and impactful stories of patients’ lives and legacies with animal-based research. This video shares the story of Joshua Frase, his life and his legacy. You’ll learn about Joshua, his family, the research team and…

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Animals in Research

Baby rhesus getting mini marshmallow treat

Environmental enrichment is an important part of caring for research animals. Research animals are provided with several types of enrichment to stimulate species-typical behaviors. These juvenile rhesus macaques are enjoying mini marshmallow treats. Interactions with their caregiver give them social and intellectual stimulation, while strengthening their bonds with each other.…

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Animals in Research

Minipigs Foraging in Their Pen

Minipigs needed for research are fed on the floor so that they can root and forage for their feed using their snout.  They are also offered many different types of toys to help provide tactile enrichment as they enjoy sniffing, touching and manipulating objects with their snouts. And, of course,…

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Animals in Research

Mom and baby rhesus on hammock

A rhesus macaque mom climbs into a hammock with her infant at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Females reach puberty at around age three, while males are sexually mature by age four. Gestation is five and a half months, with one infant born at a time and often a year or…

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Species Entry

Japanese shrew

The Japanese Shrew is an important model for Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID), a disorder that affects a person’s ability to digest certain sugars.  It can affect infants, children, and adults.  Symptoms include chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, and bloating. The shrew naturally has both glucosidase and sucrose deficiencies, making it a…

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