Search Results: "Social attachment"

Featured Studies

Newly discovered brain network offers clues to social cognition

Scientists call our ability to understand another person’s thoughts—to intuit their desires, read their intentions, and predict their behavior—theory of mind. It’s an essential human trait, one that is crucial to effective social interaction. But where did it come from? Working with rhesus macaque monkeys, researchers in Winrich Freiwald’s Laboratory…

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Species Entry

Titi Monkey

Titi monkeys are one of the few nonhuman primate models that develop social attachment. Therefore, they are involved in the study of neurotransmitters and what they contribute to the biology of social attachment.  Recently, the monkeys were involved in research to develop a new technique to visualize oxytocin receptors in…

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Animals in Research

Baby titi monkey

This is a baby titi monkey with her father. Titi monkeys are highly social animals and live in family groups that include mother, father and baby.

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Animals in Research

Father caring for infant

This is a father and infant titi monkey.  These monkeys live in monogamous family groups that consist of the mother, father and offspring.  The father is the main caretaker for the infants. He brings the infant to her mother to nurse.  Infant monkeys are weaned at five months old.

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Animals in Research

Cat Housing

Cat housing takes into consideration their social, psychological and behavioral needs. Cats do well in compatible social groups with the ability to have some distance from each other when desired. Each cat must have have easy access to resting places, food, water and litter boxes.  These two cats are taking…

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Animals in Research

Mother sheep with lambs

These lambs are part of a maternal nutrition study. Whenever possible, lambs involved in research studies are raised with their mothers where they undergo normal social and emotional development. If a study requires hand-rearing, it must be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), a body responsible…

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Animals in Research

Rhesus monkey with baby grooming another monkey

Infants to geriatric animals live with their extended family groups at the California National Primate Research Center.  This allows them to exhibit natural social behavior like grooming each other and caring for their young.

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Animals in Research

Pig playtime

Pigs are smart, social animals that like to nibble and root.  Balls and puzzle toys are provided to engage them in rooting and problem solving opportunities.  These caregivers know each of their pigs by name and look forward to spending time with them every day.

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Animals in Research

Baby rhesus getting mini marshmallow treat

Environmental enrichment is an important part of caring for research animals. Research animals are provided with several types of enrichment to stimulate species-typical behaviors. These juvenile rhesus macaques are enjoying mini marshmallow treats. Interactions with their caregiver give them social and intellectual stimulation, while strengthening their bonds with each other.…

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