Search Results: "Safety and efficacy testing"

Animals in Research

Fourteen-day-old zebrafish larva

Zebrafish larvae are raised from eggs to eventually become breeding adult fish that provide embryos for research studies. The transparent bodies of these young fish allow for non-invasive assessment of organ and tissue changes, something that is not possible with mammals. Their transparency is very helpful when conducting safety and…

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Species Entry

Dog

Dogs, although one of the least common animals needed for research, are among the most important.  Many cancers in dogs are identical, or almost identical, to human cancers. The cancer in dogs often develops faster, making them an ideal model to see if a certain therapy is effective. Many breeds…

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Animals in Research

Zebrafish embryos – 24-hours-old

Zebrafish embryos are transparent and they also develop quickly. These particular embryos are shown twenty-four hours after fertilization. Each week, a breeding pair of adult zebrafish generate hundreds of embryos that can be used to study the safety and efficacy of new medications. The use of these embryos has helped…

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Animals in Research

Zebrafish embryos – 30-hours-old

Embryonic development takes place rapidly. It is also a key area of study during drug safety testing. This photo shows thirty-day-old zebrafish embryos. Because they are transparent, researchers can easily monitor the development of the embryo from fertilization to when it hatches as larval fish. The embryo in the middle…

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Animals in Research

Baby rhesus getting mini marshmallow treat

Environmental enrichment is an important part of caring for research animals. Research animals are provided with several types of enrichment to stimulate species-typical behaviors. These juvenile rhesus macaques are enjoying mini marshmallow treats. Interactions with their caregiver give them social and intellectual stimulation, while strengthening their bonds with each other.…

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Animals in Research

Marmosets with Tech and Treats

These are common marmosets in the lobby of the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Dried fruit, grapes, peanuts and other "pocket treats" are provided by their caretakers. This helps provide enrichment and also facilitates the ability to do health checks and other routine care procedures.

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Animals in Research

Mom and baby rhesus on hammock

A rhesus macaque mom climbs into a hammock with her infant at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Females reach puberty at around age three, while males are sexually mature by age four. Gestation is five and a half months, with one infant born at a time and often a year or…

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Animals in Research

Rhesus getting treat from his caregiver

Rhesus monkeys getting treats from their caregiver at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Healthy treats can include peanuts, grapes, apple slices, etc. Positive reinforcement is used to train the monkeys to move to transport boxes. These boxes safely carry monkeys to procedure rooms for blood draws, ultrasounds, TB tests, and…

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Animals in Research

Seven-day-old zebrafish larvae

A zebrafish larva is an immature form of an adult fish. In this photo, you see a seven-day-old zebrafish larvae, around the size of a quarter, swimming in water. Approximately twelve larvae live in each small test well. Test substances, such as potential new medications, are dissolved in the water…

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