Search Results: "Neonatal"

Species Entry

Baboon

Baboons have long been important models of human diseases and for understanding physiology.  This is due to their many similarities to humans. Additionally, their physiological parameters can be measured with the same equipment used for humans.  Some key research areas involving baboons include neonatal lung disease, dental development, excess fat…

Visit Species Page

Species Entry

Marmoset

The common marmoset is important in studies for safety, reproductive biology, neuroscience, and drug development. Its small size and many similarities with humans, as well as its  differences, make the common marmoset a valued model. In one area of research, multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory disease of the brain caused…

Visit Species Page

Species Entry

Guinea Pig

Because guinea pigs are similar to humans in the symptoms and immune response they have to bacterial infections, they have been studied for more than 200 years. They have contributed to advances in treating diseases that affect the lungs, ears, eyes, arteries, stomach, intestines, and those that are sexually transmitted.…

Visit Species Page

Species Entry

Sheep

Sheep have a similar physiology to humans, can get many of the same diseases, have a short gestation period, and their young are born at a similar weight to human babies. These characteristics are valuable in research studies related to respiratory diseases and fetal development. Sheep have contributed to many medical…

Visit Species Page

Animals in Research

Research Sheep Colony

Sheep thrive in social groups of at least five members. Research facilities strive to design housing that best meets the needs of their animals.  This flock room is lined with hay that is changed every other day allowing the sheep to graze as they would naturally on a pasture.  Their…

View and Share

Animals in Research

Mother sheep with lambs

These lambs are part of a maternal nutrition study. Whenever possible, lambs involved in research studies are raised with their mothers where they undergo normal social and emotional development. If a study requires hand-rearing, it must be approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), a body responsible…

View and Share

Animals in Research

Ernest Loves His Head Scratched

Ernest is a ram and father to lambs needed for a maternal nutrition study. He lives in the same flock room as the ewes caring for their lambs so he can see, hear, and smell the other sheep.  Since he has to be separate from the female sheep, his caregiver provides…

View and Share