Search Results: "Drug development"

Species Entry

Marmoset

The common marmoset is important in studies for safety, reproductive biology, neuroscience, and drug development. Its small size and many similarities with humans, as well as its  differences, make the common marmoset a valued model. In one area of research, multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory disease of the brain caused…

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Animals in Research

Noel the mouse

Mice are one of the most common animals needed for research.  Most mice do not usually get individual names...but sometimes a technician will develop a special bond with one of their mice, like the technician who named Noel.  Noel is a Swiss Webster mouse. Swiss Webster mice are often needed…

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Animals in Research

Beagle Playing with Kong

Beagles have been important for many medical advancements, from understanding body systems and disease processes to the development of new medicines and treatments for both people and animals. Researchers, veterinarians and animal caregivers work together to provide for the needs of these amazing animals. Toys are provided and rotated regularly…

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Species Entry

Sheep

Sheep have a similar physiology to humans, can get many of the same diseases, have a short gestation period, and their young are born at a similar weight to human babies. These characteristics are valuable in research studies related to respiratory diseases and fetal development. Sheep have contributed to many medical…

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Animals in Research

Baby rhesus getting mini marshmallow treat

Environmental enrichment is an important part of caring for research animals. Research animals are provided with several types of enrichment to stimulate species-typical behaviors. These juvenile rhesus macaques are enjoying mini marshmallow treats. Interactions with their caregiver give them social and intellectual stimulation, while strengthening their bonds with each other.…

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Animals in Research

Mom and baby rhesus on hammock

A rhesus macaque mom climbs into a hammock with her infant at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center. Females reach puberty at around age three, while males are sexually mature by age four. Gestation is five and a half months, with one infant born at a time and often a year or…

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